UT University Health Services

STI Testing at UHS

It's easy to get routine, confidential testing for HIV and other STIs (sexually transmitted infections) at UHS. Charges apply.

step one
Schedule an appointment. Same-day and next-day appointments are usually available.

 

If you don't have symptoms and just want to get checked out:

  • choose Nursing Department, then STI Screening (no symptoms) to see a nurse,
    OR
  • if you are due for your annual women’s wellness exam, choose Women’s Health and then choose Annual Exam with or without Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing or Birth Control, so you can get your annual exam and be screened for STIs at the same visit.


If you have symptoms or have been told by a partner that you have been exposed to an STI, choose either Women's Health or General Medicine, as appropriate, then STI Concern/Testing to be tested and/or to talk about possible preventative treatment.


step one
When prompted, complete a brief questionnaire so we can tailor your visit to your needs.


step three
Before your appointment

  • Don't empty your bladder for at least 1 hour before your scheduled appointment time.
  • Bring your insurance card (if you have one) and a valid photo ID like your school ID to your appointment.


step three
Get your results one to five days after your appointment. During your visit, you'll tell us how you want us to send them to you.

Cost and Privacy

Your cost depends on which tests are done and how you pay.

Most health insurance plans pay at least part of the cost for STI testing, but you don't need insurance to use UHS.

For details, go to the section below that matches your situation.

You don't need health insurance to use UHS. A discounted rate is available to students who don't have health insurance, who are covered by Medicaid or Medicare, or are otherwise underinsured.

To find out what your health insurance will cover, you can call your insurance company or let our Cashier/Insurance Office staff help you.

If you have health insurance don't want to use it due to concerns about privacy, be advised:

  • Your appointment may cost significantly more without insurance.
  • At your visit, you must notify the UHS Cashier/Insurance Office that you don't want a claim filed, and
  • You must pay in full on the day of service.
  • Occasionally, the results of a lab test indicate a need for further testing, which can be done on the specimens collected at your appointment. If so, UHS will notify you. If you don't want UHS to bill your insurance company for those additional tests, you must pay for them within two business days after we notify you.

Go here for important information about the financial impact of choosing not to use your insurance.

For tests performed at the UHS Laboratory (syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea), UHS covers 50% of the student's financial responsibility.* All other STI lab tests are sent to an off-campus reference lab, which bills your insurance directly.

* Due to insurance regulations, UHS cannot cover any part of the financial responsibility for students who have insurance and choose not to file a claim.

If you don't have insurance or are covered by Medicaid or Medicare or are otherwise underinsured, you will receive discounted rates.

The Get Yourself Tested Fund is available for students with no STI symptoms who cannot afford the cost of testing. For more information, visit the Get Yourself Tested Fund page.

To protect your privacy, we don't post medical details to What I Owe. Anyone with eProxy privileges to your What I Owe will see the amount due to UHS, but not why you came in or what services you received.

If you have insurance but you don't want the policy holder to know that you have had STI testing, you may choose not to use your insurance for that appointment. Before you decide, please read Privacy with regards to Billing to learn how this decision affects privacy and cost.


The Appointment and Tests

In a routine screening appointment (no symptoms), you may be tested for any of the following:
Chlamydia  

Gonorrhea  

Hepatitis A, B, & C
HIV
Syphilis

Your personal risk factors will determine the specific tests that are recommended for you, but you can choose to get additional tests.

We ask you to complete a confidential questionnaire when you're booking your appointment. Your answers help your clinician choose the most appropriate tests for your circumstances so that your screening doesn't cost more than necessary and so that you get the most relevant information. We tailor the appointment to your unique needs, so it's important that you give honest and accurate information.

You'll talk about the questionnaire with your clinician, who will recommend lab tests based on your individual risk factors. We will collect specimens for your lab tests and ask how you would like to receive your results. Based on your individual risk factors, your clinician may recommend testing multiple sites (vaginal, oral, or rectal). The lab test for each of these sites is billed separately.

You'll have a chance to talk about any concerns you may have and learn how to protect your health. UHS clinicians are non-judgmental and welcome all students. While many appointments are shorter, plan on being at UHS for about an hour so you're not late to work or class.

At your appointment, you'll be asked how you want to get your results, which will be available one to five days after your appointment.

The next step depends on the type of STI for which you've tested positive. Sometimes, we can call in a prescription to your pharmacy. Other times, you may be asked to come in to get treatment and talk with a nurse or medical provider.

Most people who get a sexually transmitted infection do not have symptoms, but symptoms that might be caused by an STI include:

  • Genital rash, itching, bumps, or sores
  • Discharge from the genitals
  • A burning sensation when you urinate
  • Unexplained abdominal pain

In the cases of both herpes and  HPV, lab testing is useful only when a person has symptoms that suggest an infection, such as a rash, bumps, warts, or sores. Tests cannot say with accuracy that you don't have herpes or  HPV. Therefore, routine screening isn't helpful or recommended. Learn more here.

If you think you might have herpes or HPV, schedule an appointment to talk with a medical provider.

For the best HPV prevention,

We follow current CDC guidelines by using 4th generation antigen/antibody testing with reflex MultiSpot testing. These tests can detect HIV antibodies much sooner after exposure than previous tests. Rapid HIV testing is not available at UHS at this time.

Why should I get tested? How does getting tested help me? 
Most people who get a sexually transmitted infection do not have symptoms. Early diagnosis and management are important in reducing the risk of complications – including infertility.

Get tested at the first sign of an STI. Women can request STI screening at their annual well woman exam, and men can schedule regular testing. While testing won't prevent an STI, it can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment.

If you have multiple or new sexual partners, consider getting tested more frequently than once per year. Check out the current Centers for Disease Control guidelines.

 Most people who get a sexually transmitted infection do not have symptoms. Early diagnosis and management are important in reducing the risk of complications – including infertility.

Get tested at the first sign of an STI. Women can request STI screening at their annual well woman exam, and men can schedule regular testing. While testing won't prevent an STI, it can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment.

If you have multiple or new sexual partners, consider getting tested more frequently than once per year. Check out the current Centers for Disease Control guidelines.

You can bring a friend/partner, but your appointment is just for you. If your friend/partner is a fellow UT student and wants to get tested, encourage them to make their own appointment. Non-students can get tested off campus.


Communicating positive results with sexual partners
Telling a partner that you have an STI can be intimidating, but it ensures that they can receive testing and treatment.

  • They may be at risk for an STI
  • Stop having sex until they get tested and treated
  • They will need to contact their other partners
  • Accurate information about your STI, which you can find here.

  • Be honest and straightforward, and remain open to your partner's questions, thoughts, and emotions.
  • Plan what you are going to say. Imagine how you would like to be told.
  • Remember that some STIs don't cause symptoms immediately, if ever. It is possible that you or your partner got the STI from a previous relationship, even one in which you didn't have penetrative sex.
  • Talking face-to-face is preferable, but if you decide to call or text, ask if it's a good time before giving them the news.

If you're concerned that your partner might hurt you, notifying them by phone, email, text, anonymously, or not at all might be safer than telling them in person. If you have concerns about a member of the UT-Austin community, contact the 24-hour Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL) at 512-232-5050.

If you have an STI that can be treated, but not cured (like genital herpes, HIV, or HPV), talk to your healthcare provider about how to avoid passing the STI to sexual partners and you tell your future partners before any sexual contact occurs.

  • Be open and straightforward. You could start by saying, "Before we have sex, I want us to talk about STDs and protection, because I have [type of STI]." Create a conversation that is open to all questions, thoughts, and emotions to make your potential partner feel more comfortable.
  • Give your potential partner time to process the information and make an informed decision about having sex with you. Let them know that you are available to answer questions and to continue the conversation.
  • Know that there are other ways you can be intimate or express your feelings for one another if you decide not to have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. If you decide to be sexual in any way, practice safer sex.



Healthy Sexuality

Healthy Sexuality Topics
Classes and Workshops
Condoms
Get Free or Low-Cost Condoms
Contraception
Safer Sex Ambassadors
Contraception for College Students Video Series
Men's Sexual Health
Off-Campus STI / HIV testing locations
Sexual Anatomy
Sexually Transmitted Infections
UHS STI Testing
UHS Sexual Assault Forensic Exams
AlcoholEdu and SAPU
Women's Health




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